Walking in Acadia National Park

Bubble Mountains Acadia National Park

Time has defeated me since we got back from the States so this will be mostly a picture post. As well as great walk out with an old friend in the Catskills, I had the chance to walk a small part of the various trails in Acadia National Park, up on the North East Coast of  Maine. We stayed in Bar Harbor (great seaside location) and used that as a base for the park. In terms of the trails, none are individually that long (typically 2 to 4 miles).

But some have steep ascents (needing iron rungs hammered into the rock face in places)  and the heat has an effect on what you want to do distance / exertion-wise. But for the fitter and less time-starved folk you can also daisy chain some together for a longer day out.

Cadillac Mountain North Ridge Trail First up was a walk on one of the trails that runs around / up to the wonderfully named Cadillac Mountain.

Keep reading >

Chewing the fat in the Catskills – a North Point walk

Catskills Mountains hike with soaring Raptor

I was over in the states recently (we had an empty-nester road trip, very fine it was too). And as part of that we spent some time with old friends Richard, Gina and kids. Richard knows I like a good walk (he can’t not, based on my endless Facebook updates) and he had kindly planned a trip out for the two of us old mates to catchup, chew the fat (and burgers .. later on) and get some views. He lives in upstate New York and the Catskill Mountains are a short drive away, so off we headed on a sunny morning.

Keep reading >

A ramble from Crowden

Crowden Hike Peak District

I had limited time this weekend so petitioned my very accommodating ‘Butterley Booters‘ mates, Jenny and Taru, to keep to maybe four hours of hiking somewhere near us. A ramble from Crowden to Laddow Rocks was arranged.

Taru’s suggestion came from the ‘The Pennine Divide’ book that she has. The book comes from the ‘freedom to roam‘ series from the Ramblers (said he, glancing at the cover as he types). This particular book is by Andrew Bibby.

I hadn’t seen the book before and I’ve only had chance to flick through it but the introductory section is nicely written and the walks are really well described.

Keep reading >

A Snowdon jaunt

I headed over to Yr Wyddfa / Snowdon on Saturday with some Marsden mates and my son (also a mate). I knew them all but (stick with me) they didn’t all know each other before the walk. I forget how a big a village / small town Marsden is.

Five of the guys hadn’t walked up Snowdon before so there was a nice sense of excitement. I’ve been on a few ‘Snowdon in the Snow’ trips over the last 4 years, always sociable fun and a good day’s walk. But being in January or early Feb, they had all been susceptible to poor weather. In fact, last year saw four of us battle a blizzard and turn back (sensibly) just before the Clogwyn Coch area.

So this year’s trip, falling as it did in the third week of March, could have brought clear skies and amazing vistas.

Keep reading >

Snatching words on the Marsden poetry trail

March Hill Marsden Moors hike Hiking Yorkshire Walking rambling

I set out last Saturday with friends Jenny, Karl and Taru, after the Hare surveying training, to walk the Marsden poetry trail that I put together last year.

Taru and Jenny had wanted to do the ten mile circular that navigates Pule Hill, Close Moss and March Hill. The weather looked like it would be pretty good to us. Although good in Marsden is relative: ‘fresh’ or ‘blowy’ would be kind euphemisms.

But as Simon Armitage says in ‘Snow’ (a great piece and a stop along the trail) : ‘We should make the most of the light”. That’s a pointer to the poet’s birthplace and conditioning right there.

The poems that we took turns reading out at each ‘waymarker’ (yes, I sprang that on them) were frequently snatched from mouth and hand.

And the winds crashing against the industrial cliffs of Pule Hill quarry knocked Taru and Jenny over at one point. Then threatened to snatch at least one of the three hounds off and away into neighbouring Lancashire.

Keep reading >

Edale to Kinder Low Circular Hike

Edale Kinder Low Hike National Trust Helicopter

Brodie stopped a few feet below me and gave me a look: ‘so, who were you calling old?’ she seemed to be asking. I was picking my way hesitantly down Grindsbrook Clough, a pretty steep rocky path that hugs the brook and wends its way off Kinder Low, back down to Edale, which was not yet visible below us. My right knee and Achilles tendon were both aching a bit so Brodie had to stop every few yards or so to wait for me to catch up with her (she was on the extendable lead so didn’t really have a choice). Jenny was ahead of us and Karl behind, all of us watching out for especially slippy rocks.

Keep reading >